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Funny how many opinions there are in the world but humor me. Say the need arises to actually draw your carry pistol on someone. Some people say to use loud commands and if the target doesn't comply then engage. Others say to never draw unless you intend to pull the trigger right then because brandishing a weapon without the use of force gets you locked up. Anyone else got some insight.

I have always been in the boat of not drawing unless the situation has escalated to the point that the target must be stopped. I would think shouting commands would draw attention to you and possible get you shot by another ccw that doesn't know what is going on. Troll on forum :)
 

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I hope that I never have to be in a situation like that, but one never knows.
For me, it's very difficult to answer a questions like this...unless it happens to you...it's one of those, "You had to be there!"
I tend to think that if the firearm comes out of the holster, there is going to be a big flash and a very loud noise.
My primary concern is avoidance, run, hide, apologize, whatever is necessary to de-escalate the situation, but an in you face robbery in a Wally World parking lot does not give one much time to decide on the appropriate actions. Of all actions, SA may be the best thing one can sharpen, it's a cruel world out there...one must not take the possibilities of becoming a victim lightly.

Stay armed...stay alert...stay safe!
 

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Depends on the situation.

I can think of many where drawing and firing are the only answer, but on the other side, there would be many where simply threatening the use of deadly force would end the situation.

My goal is to try to avoid getting into either type of situation to start with.
 

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As of late....in my area the situation has been different.....Home Invasions....not being safe in one's own home.....it's really getting out of whack.
 

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It's simple, if your not seriously considering shooting the person, don't draw. As far as brandishing, in many states the threat of deadly force is warranted as long as the use of deadly force is warranted. In an event where I feared for my life I would draw and hopefully that alone would end it, assuming the situation allowed for me to find out, sometimes it won't.
 

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Depends on the situation's specifics and dynamics, of course, as to how soon a given citizen justifiably feels sufficiently threatened such that bringing force to bear is the right answer.

Depends on the state's specific statutes, as well, as to what particular legal justification exists. Generally speaking, the "reasonable man" standard applies, in which it's on the citizen to gauge the point at which a reasonable person should be every bit as concerned over impending loss of life and limb.

But when it does come to that point to where you're legitimately at risk of loss of life or limb, at minimum at the point when you legitimately fear that loss, you have every right as a citizen to take the gloves off and halt that threat to you and yours. If merely going for your gun does it, great; if drawing, fine; if it requires firing, so be it. If you can get through things without those steps, then you've won the holiday turkey. But the last thing you want to do is to blow the call so badly, or to be so afraid of ramifications of taking legitimate steps to protect yourself, that you're frozen into inaction and hesitate. Such hesitation can easily get you killed, situation depending.

If concerned about when, how much, how to go about it ... consider a series of CQB type force-on-force training, in which you're challenged with various hands-on, hand-to-hand, knife, and gun defensive situations at closer distances, ones in which your opponent has every intent and opportunity to harm you using whatever contrivance, subterfuge, speed or degree of violence can most likely get the better of you. You'd be surprised how quickly that little "line in the sand" can change as the dynamics of a situation blow sideways. The more training you can get along these lines, the better.
 

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It's simple, if your not seriously considering shooting the person, don't draw. ...
^ I think this comes close to summing it up. Of course, it assumes that you are educated on what is legal and are making a prudent and reasonable judgement - that's the fuzzy-logic part.
 

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In the Gravest Extreme.

If you shoot someone your life will be forever changed.

But sometimes if you don't (shoot someone) your life may be brought to an abrupt end. There is a clearly drawn line in the sand if it is "him or me" all others would depend on the situation, they would.
 

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There is no pat answer to your questions, other than to say it depends.
 

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Here's the thing, too: in most states, the "reasonableness" language in the use-of-force statutes specifically indicates it's the citizen's call as to where the line is drawn, yet the implication we each need to understand is that it's the DA and a jury of 12 others who get to determine whether the actions one takes are deemed (after the fact) reasonable. And it's going to be their opinion that ultimately matters, legally speaking; not ours on this instant it's happening to us. That's the fly in the ointment, for each of us to decide based on our being reasonable, responsible citizens who want to make it home that night, who want to avoid getting flushed by our peers for doing what we had to do in order to survive a deadly encounter.
 

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Only you can make the decision to draw or not. Since no self defense situation is exact there will be too many variables for anyone to give you advice as to what you should do.

It is a personal decision and one to not be taken lightly, for when the pistol clears leather you have now committed yourself to a possible shoot. Split second decisions are also in the mix as well. You may not have much time to analyze the situation before you draw.

I believe that most of us simply wish that we are never put into that situation when we must draw our weapon, but if it has to be done then you do what you have to do. Just remember it will be a life-changing event.
 

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The only real answer is: Before it's too late.
 

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Well I say draw only when you believe that a life is in dangers (yours or someone else)

When you draw be prepared to fire....immediately but you might not have too

React to the situation
 
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IMHO it starts with situation awareness. If you see a threat is possible, you try to control it however you can. If that is giving ground, putting an obstacle inbetween, & yelling commands. Drawing can cause the threat to split. If you draw call LEO immediately. The first report gets some acceptance immediately.
 

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Been there. Done that. The answer to your question is ONLY YOU WILL KNOW. Only you can tell how bad the situation is. Only you can control what happens. Advoidance is you best plan. But remember when you draw you do not have to shoot. But if you draw remember you must have the will to shoot and stop the threat. Nine times out of ten drawing will stop the threat.
Good Luck out there.
 

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I have never thought of my handgun as a deterrent because I have never imagined the "sight of it" to be a defensive tactic. My instincts are the deterrent. My handgun is my tool of last resort. I will expend EVERY OTHER TOOL before that handgun comes into view. But if/when it does, I am well-past being on the defense. I am, at that point, in a totally offensive mindset & taking the fight to my assailant. He will then be responding to MY ACTIONS, not me to his. He will have to provide immediate, crystal-clear & obvious reasons why I SHOULDN'T pull the trigger. The time for wishy-washy, uncommitted response went away the second my muzzle cleared my holster.
 
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