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Discussion Starter #1
Defender is running great with about 600 plus rounds through it. Going to fire a little less at the range as it's real purpose is carry.

Do I replace the entire spring assembly before moving it to carry duty just the main recoil spring or is it too early to bother replacing anything cause it's functioning well.

I also ordered some Wolff recoil spring in a higher weight to try and reduce recoil a bit. Does Anyone think that the heavier spring coils cause any reliability issues?

Basicly Im in a delimma because I shot it a bunch to make sure it's reliable buy now I'm questioning that ang new parts or changing springs bring me back to square one of going back tm the range and shooting it a ton again?

When should i consider spring replacment and do I always do main recoil and guiderod spring at the same time or just the big one?

Help!
 

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Not familiar with your pistol, but any factory or any well-known quality aftermarket recoil spring should last you thousands of rounds. Extra power springs and reliability are pretty much going to depend on what sort of ammo you are shooting. Stock spring ratings were designed on average to cover most average ammo used. Shooting bulk hardball ammo may not be as reliable with an extra power spring as would shooting PD or +P ammo. You may not have any issues at all with an extra power spring. My P220 has a 20lb rated recoil spring and I've never had issues with any bulk (WWB) 45acp ammo.
I must say that going with a higher rated spring in order to mitigate recoil is a step in the wrong direction in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I must say that going with a higher rated spring in order to mitigate recoil is a step in the wrong direction in my opinion.

Why?
 

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One reason being, the slide returns to battery faster, not always a great idea since the bullet has to feed up the ramp. I stick to factory specs unless I'm messing around with handloads.
 

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Why? Mainly my opinion, and I have experimented plenty over the years including the 1911 style pistols. I'm no expert on the subject, so I'll leave you with some links that can better explain than I.

Custom Glock Racing - Spring Wars
1911 Reliability Overview: The Recoil Spring
DPM Systems Technologies Ltd.
From one of the articles:
Effects of a Heavier spring:

Recoil is transferred to the shooter over a longer duration of time due to lower slide velocities.

Slower slides equal a longer recovery time for the shooter.

The shooter does more work, as there is more force to counteract. This often causes and increase in muzzle flip.

The chances of a limp wrist style jam are increased, as there is more force working to unlock your wrists.

The chance of the slide short stroking and causing a feed jam is increased.

Increased muzzle dip when the slide closes for a slower follow-up shot.
 

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Do I replace the entire spring assembly before moving it to carry duty just the main recoil spring or is it too early to bother replacing anything cause it's functioning well.

I also ordered some Wolff recoil spring in a higher weight to try and reduce recoil a bit. Does Anyone think that the heavier spring coils cause any reliability issues?

When should i consider spring replacment and do I always do main recoil and guiderod spring at the same time or just the big one?

Help!
Change your springs on this gun at about 3000 rounds. I very much do not recommend changing the weight of the spring because it can drastically affect timing. Your gun has a small margin of error in timing since the slide dwell is so short anyway. Use regular strength springs only in these smaller guns.
 

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I'm sending you the info from the FAQ section on Wolff Springs website concerning the spring on your Defender. This man knows his springs and I personally use nothing but his on ALL of my semi's.

I'd also take RamRods advice very seriously. It's vital to have the correct weight spring installed for a carry weapons reliability. Everything HAS to be in time for a chopped 1911 to function properly. Putting in a heavier spring is going to cause you problems with that shorty .45. Check out the post I placed on reducing recoil in this section. The best recoil reducing device is a strong grip and upper and lower body strength and as EDR said "practice, practice, practice". Them recoil reduction systems are just one more thing that can tie up a CCW if they fail IMO. If you can't handle the recoil and accurately shoot that Defender I'd sell it and buy a Springer EMP in 9mm. Accurate shot placement IS the key to taking out a BG in a SD situation. I am not slamming your shooting ability with that Defender so please don't take offence to my last two sentences. :bier:
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Wolff quote from his site:

"The performance of your gun is the best indicator of when a spring needs to be replaced. Factors such as increased ejection distance, improper ejection and/or breeching, lighter hammer indents on primers, misfires, poor cartridge feeding from magazines, frequent jams, stove pipes and other malfunctions are all possible indications of fatigued springs or improper springs.


Springs such as magazine springs, striker springs and recoil springs are subjected to higher stress levels and will require more frequent replacement than other lower stressed springs such as firing pin springs and hammer springs.


Wolff springs are made with the highest grade materials and workmanship. Most Wolff recoil springs will remain stable for many thousands of rounds. Some recoil springs in compact pistols, especially where dual springs are used or are replaced by a single spring may require changing after 500 - 1500 rounds. Springs that become rusty, bent or otherwise damaged should always be replaced. Again, changes you observe in your firearm's performance are the best indicators that a change is needed."

End of quote
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Hope this helps. Yo have to be very vigilant with a chopped 1911. If everything is not in time you WILL have FTF/FTE issues which can be irritating at the range, but also deadly in time of need on the streets. That's why I carry a full size 1911. Been down the chopped road and won't take it again.


Here is his link:

Wolff GunSprings Home Page

Give the man a call if you want to talk about the correct spring weight to use with your Defender. He knows 1911's like the back of his hand and is very helpful.

Regards,

SG
 

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This is one way that you know when your recoil spring needs to be replaced.

Note how far your ejected brass is being tossed out of your ejection port with a fresh recoil spring installed.

When your brass starts getting chucked out further than that (using the same ammo of course) - it's time to install a fresh recoil spring.
This is a great indicator because as your recoil spring weakens the slide moves to the rear harder and faster causing your cartridge case to whap the ejector harder & with much more force - and that results in your ejected brass being tossed further away from the pistol.

Also... I would not change spring weight just for the heckovit if your pistol is running fine with the factory weight spring.

If you want to play around with the recoil spring then buy a Variable but, stick with the same spring weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I Just assumed that since one of the leaders Wolff makes the original 19lb a 21lb and a 23lb specific for the Defender that they would work fine but I could be wrong.

I guess my real question is with 99.9% of shooting being Winchester white box 230gr. could the spring need replacing in less then 1000 rounds?
 
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