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I'm interested in water-based cleaners, such as Hoppe's Elite and MPro7, for my Ruger LCR because my wife has a very sensitive nose. I am concerned, however, about the water getting stuck and causing rust. The internet has some horror stories, such as this one.

I suppose using the water-based cleaner for the bore and chambers is not an issue, as I'll wipe it away immediately and cover with oil.

Would it be prudent to use an oil-based solvent, such as Hoppe's #9, for the breach face, the crane, and under the extractor?

Should I just give up the efforts to reduce odor, add Hoppe's #9 to my deodorant, and tell my wife to get used to it? :p
 

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When I was in basic training at Fort Sill, we used metal trash cans filled with very hot water to clean our M16's. The trash cans were lined up and had a heater to keep the water hot for each trash can. The metal on the guns would be so hot that it would evaporate the water completly before any part of the gun could rust. I still clean my guns the same way when I do a deep cleaning on them.

I know that's not what you asked but that's what your questioned remined me of.

In answer to your question, tell her to get used to it! LOL!
 
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Hoppe's #9 is my cleaner. I like the smell. But then, I like the smell of gasoline and the old style airplane glue. :stoned:
Use it outside or tell her to go in the other room... YMMV
 

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I use Breakfree CLP only on my guns. It has very little odor and works well. I have no doubt that luckydog's method works but it's not for me.
 

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I use Breakfree CLP only on my guns. It has very little odor and works well. I have no doubt that luckydog's method works but it's not for me.
It not my method, it's how I was taught by Driil Seargent Cruz and Drill Seargent Jones at Fort Sill in 1978.
 
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Don't use it...ANYWHERE. Clean your LCR in the garage & buy your wife a nice bouquet of flowers every time you need to do it. I've been (happily) married for a l-o-n-g time, trust me, flowers will cover a LOT of, uhhh..."sensitivity". :biggrin2:
 
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Febreze when you get done cleaning your Ruger. Or send the wife to the mall. I use RustePrufe, no negative odor, but I think the company folded as I've been trying to get into contact with them to restock our store inventory.
 

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I thought the old Army trash cans full of hot water method was for removing cosmoline, not for general cleaning.
Nope. Not at Fort Sill in 1978.
 

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After you use a water-based cleaner, simply ensure that you remove all of it (compressed air is your friend here), and then use an appropriate amount of your chose lubricant. Whether it's RemOil, Hoppe's, or FrogLube, any oil based lubricant/preservative will displace water when used properly.

I'd probably just use RemOil for an LCR. I find that light, simple oils of that sort seem to work best for me on firearms of that sort. I keep the FrogLube for polymer pistols and gas-operated rifles.
 

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I thought the old Army trash cans full of hot water method was for removing cosmoline, not for general cleaning.
It's a carry-over from black powder days. The wheels of military regulations turn...very slowly. :rofl:
 

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Nope. Not at Fort Sill in 1978.
Well, by 1986, Army methods we were taught was NOTHING but breakfree. Never used hot water, or anything else that I remember. I will say our issued rifles were anything but new, and none had any cosmoline on them at the time of issue. They were well maintained, though. Heck, we got M16A1s, lol. Mine was double stamped GM/Hydromatic.
 

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Well, by 1986, Army methods we were taught was NOTHING but breakfree. Never used hot water, or anything else that I remember. I will say our issued rifles were anything but new, and none had any cosmoline on them at the time of issue. They were well maintained, though. Heck, we got M16A1s, lol. Mine was double stamped GM/Hydromatic.
I know they changed it but it's still a great way to clean your gun. It's amazing how fast the hot metal dries. Then just a very light coat of oil and your good to go. I use synthetic oil on everything nowdays. That way you need very little. The less oil you can get away with, the less dirt it will attract!
 

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The Armalite manual STILL says, in the absence of dedicated gun-maintanience fluids, clean your AR with Automatic Transmission Fluid & lube with (new or used) motor oil. How's your wife gonna' know if your cleaning your Ruger or ...maintaining her Camry? :biggrin2:
 

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The Armalite manual STILL says, in the absence of dedicated gun-maintanience fluids, clean your AR with Automatic Transmission Fluid & lube with (new or used) motor oil. How's your wife gonna' know if your cleaning your Ruger or ...maintaining her Camry? :biggrin2:
:rofl::rofl::rofl:
 
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