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Which do you feel is more essential? Quality night sights or a weapon mounted flashlight?

  • Night Sights

    Votes: 29 78.4%
  • Weapon Mounted Flashlight

    Votes: 8 21.6%

  • Total voters
    37
  • Poll closed .
41 - 49 of 49 Posts

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Training? What's that?

I grew up shooting raiding varmints in the chickens or in the barn roost made for the white king pigeons that my dad kept by holding a dodgy D-Cell EverReady flashlight with a sliding switch that was magnetic so it could be fixed on ferrous surfaces. One would make ready to shoot and the already feeble light would go out about half the time due to a bad connection, switch, bulb or other unknown gremlins in the workings.

By the time I was 18 and got my first .38 Special revolver, I had graduated to a green plastic bodied EverReady six-volt lantern so shot critters at night one-handed while holding the lantern. EverReady must have perfected the "spontaneous darkness" feature for that one also was capable of leaving the shooter in the dark at the most inexpedient time.

I can do a light.

I'd pick night sights over a mounted light, but I only have one CZ 75 BD that has factory night sights and I don't make use of them.

I particularly don't want baggage hanging off my guns.
 

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I went with night sights for two reasons. First and foremost because my bedside gun is a .45ACP Beretta PX4 Storm outfitted with a Crimson Trace green laser sight but also because I don't like the idea of having to point a gun at something to find out whether or not it's a legitimate target. That's why I keep a 1000 lumen Olight flashlight right next to the Beretta.
 

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I went with night sights. They came stock on my VP9 and work very well in low light. I carry a Nitecore flashlight with me which is on my night stand when I sleep.
Like a lot of people, I'm old school; for instance, I use iron sights on everything I own just because that's what I've always used and am pretty damn proficient with. For the record, I realize this isn't an iron sights vs red dot conversation, just throwing it out there that whatever works for you, go with it. As always, train as much as you can with your preferred setup. Good luck.
 

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As with most things... it depends. Evaluate the purpose and then match the right tool(s).

For me, all my EDC options have red dots on them now. That negates the need for night sights. Most of my time out and about is during daylight hours; I don't often go out after dark. When I do, I at least have a pocket light that can be used in various ways. To keep a small and discreet EDC carry that I carry every moment I can, I go without a WML.

For woods carry, however, I have a 10 mm XDm with red dot and a WML. If I need to engage a bear or dog on the trail to/from bowhunting, having a bright light on the gun to identify and engage with is a plus, and a WML doesn't add much to an already larger size gun. All the holsters are set up to accommodate the WML and red dot.

At home, the lights are on most of the time unless it's sleep time. When it is sleep time I have the same full size 10mm with WML handy, as well as WML equipped long guns.

This is what works for me, IMO. Everyone else's situation is different than mine, and I recommend evaluating what the needs are and going from there.
 

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I like night sights, but a light is a more useful option... even considering I have multiple handheld lights on/near me.

If I can get night sights, I try to. If it is a home defense gun... easily see where it is and the direction it is facing. But a lighted target gives the profile of irons. I have a light on my J-frame, but no night sights (laser is more of a dry fire training tool... but doesn’t hurt being present; I check zero periodically, but shoot without it).

We just switched to Glocks with Ameriglo night sights. Really like them... especially with that orange painted front sight. Now if we could get lights approved at the port... it would be a step in the right direction.
 

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Crimson Trace has wonderful videos that will make it clear which to buy first, however prejudice their views.
Lasers don't need a good eye to direct the bullet to The Spot and may save any innocent bystanders grief via fewer misses.
I have tried most all the handgun lasers and as the cheap man pays the most experiences tell, only Crimson Trace is worth any money at all with fewer headaches and less tweaking, stay more time on target. Always buy green, not red of these two choices, as red fades more in daylight, etc.

That said, realize that lasers require MUCH more time/money/tweaking than night sights.
Batteries (annually - free from CTrace), I usually have to tweak laser back to Zero thereafter
Zeroing after deep cleaning or just wear/tear may be every month if shooting every week.
Lens cleaning and protection - rarely

Lastly, if CT doesn't have the ideal green laser yet for your handgun, then WAIT for it. I might regret those times I bought red, then sold it when green arrived = time/money
.... Unless if for The PD weapon on board, perhaps peace of mind for nighttime protection in red for awhile.
 

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I use a weapon light in my own home. Inside my home I treat my firearm as an offensive weapon. I need to be able to go on the offensive to get to my kids and be VERY sure of the target. When using a good light, the faint night sights are not visible.
When outside of my home, Night sights. My firearm is a defensive tool outside of the home. It's primary purpose is to help me retreat. In order to draw a firearm, you must already be sure of the threat in public, so handheld light or no light and just night sights.
 
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