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Does any one make a good bull Dog handgun in 45 Colt? Not talking about the Judge but a good quality Bull Dog type handgun.
 

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Whats a "bull dog" type?

Charter Arms has a model called the bulldog.
 

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I think he means a snubbie...
 

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Not much market for them I believe. And as much as I love the round and have confidence in it, especially out of SAA clones, prices for the rounds have skyrocketed lately. I saw a box of 50 going for 40 bucks last week for normal round nose lead bullets. Maybe its cheaper in your neck of the woods, but I wouldn't be able to afford to practice if it was my SD round.
 

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Yes, the ammo is too pricey in Florida.....so I have to stick with 9MM or 38 spl.
 

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Handload!

I haven't shot factory .45 Colt ammo after I finished the first box 35 years ago.
 

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Since the actual Bulldog is 44spl I would just go with that. Between the 44spl and 45 Colt they are close enough that if one can do the job the other can.
 

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Traditionally a "bulldog" is a revovler that has a large bore and a short barrel. Usually 44 or 45. The name is derived from I believe the Webley British Bulldog revovler in .442, 450 and 455. It was made sometime in the late 19th to early 20th centuries. Basically any revolver with a 2 1/2" barrel or less and a caliber of 44 or 45 can be considered a traditional bulldog design. The Charter Arms Bulldog is aptly named and is of traditional design.

The smaller frame 357s are giving tradition a run for its money though. I would argue that a 357 magnum from a K or L frame sized revolver would closely fit the traditional definition but the J frame sized ones are quite a bit smaller but pound for pound have equal power.

Your best bet for them these days is the Taurus 450 mentioned above which is an EXCELLENT revovler BTW. Obviously the easiest one to get would be a Charter Bulldog. I would opt for an older model from the 70s if you can. Other than that there are short barrelled S&W 44 magnums out there as well. Also there are some conversions of 1917 Colt and S&W revolvers done out there. And there are Colt "Fitz Specials" done that are highly sought after collectors pieces (if you can verify its originality). These generally came in 45 Colt but a few have surfaced in 45 ACP (one I would pay dearly to own).
 
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