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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been practicing when I can find ammo with my Springfield XDSC. I have put 150-200 rds through it. I like everything about the gun except the fact I can place shots better with my Kel-Tec PF9. I have lots of rounds through that little gun. I am consistently shooting left and low with the Springfield. I have been told not to touch the sights until shooting from a bench rest. My only conclusion is I have trained WAY more with the PF9 and very little with the SAXD9CS due to hard to find expensive ammo. I just assumed I would be "better" with the superior firearm right from the start. I understand the site picture is 6 oclock hold.

Any help welcomed:biggrin2:
 

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Start looking high and right.
Seriously. When I shoot my LCR I was hitting low/left of bullseye when I thought I was dead on. I shifted my vision a little high/right of where I was aiming and Bam! there it was.
 

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150-200 rounds isn't a lot, relatively speaking. Practice more (when you can find ammo) and then adjust the sights if need be. In the end it might not be the gun for you, but you aren't at the point where you can decide that after 200 rounds.
 

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"I have been told not to touch the sights until shooting from a bench rest."

Whoever told you that isn't telling you the complete story. The pistol's sights could just be off. Simple as that.

Your trigger control, hold, sight picture, type of ammo. etc. could be an issue, true enough. But a bench rest isn't the arbitrator of any of those issues either.
 

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Trigger control and sight picture are the two most critical elements of accuracy.
 

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"I have been told not to touch the sights until shooting from a bench rest."

Whoever told you that isn't telling you the complete story. The pistol's sights could just be off. Simple as that.

Your trigger control, hold, sight picture, type of ammo. etc. could be an issue, true enough. But a bench rest isn't the arbitrator of any of those issues either.
I think the advice the OP was given was to prevent the OP from just adjusting his sights instead of fixing whatever he may be doing wrong. Then again, the sights could just be off.
 

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The gun really isn't broken in yet but go ahead and fire of 5-6 shots for grouping. Once you have a group, adjust sights to bring it to where you were aiming. Breaking it in will get the internal parts smoothed out and fit to each other, including getting the barrel fit into the final battery location.
 

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I have been practicing with my Springfield XDSC. I am consistently shooting left and low with the Springfield. I have been told not to touch the sights until shooting from a bench rest.

I just assumed I would be "better" with the superior firearm right from the start.
Confirm your grip, your trigger control and your hand's motion during firing. Ensure you're not folding your hand inward/down, not pushing your trigger finger to the side (instead of pulling straight back). Check the guides to POA/POI errors with technique (click).

IMO, not every gun is going to be equally easily controlled by a given shooter, equally easy to exercise proper trigger and grip control. And not every gun is going to be equally well-suited to a given shooter's "sweet spot" when it comes to the relation of the bore axis to the hand, the amount and shape of grip for control, the length of pull, etc. Changes in these areas can indeed result in one gun working just peachy, but another gun being a comparative disaster.

Data point: With the "AirWeight" class of snubbie revolvers by S&W, I simply cannot reliably strike COM at anything beyond 5yds with them, whereas I can nail a Glock 19, CZ 75/P-01 or 1911 nearly every time, even after months or years away from one. There's simply something about my strength, technique, hand positioning, trigger pull method, the bore axis relationship to my hand, and the recoil impulse that conspires against me in a few handguns, whereas many are nearly perfect in that regard. Of course, like many folks, I've occasionally dealt with the targeting errors induced by poor technique when using a given gun. But IMO the gun itself and how it matches us matters more than many folks believe.
 

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What bullet weight are you using???? My XDSC loves 124 gr and I actually shoot better with the SC than my 4"
 

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Benchrest will give you some idea if it's you or the pistol, but there is plenty of room for slop there as well. If you've got a skilled shooter/instructor at your range, have him/her watch you shoot and see if you're inducing the error yourself. Very possible it's grip/trigger-technique related. Or it could be the sights. But no need to start pushing stuff left and right just yet.

Different pistols shoot differently, especially if you've been shooting a different one a lot. When I transitioned a year-ish ago to the P250 as my personal EDC, I had a low-left problem with some ugly groups, and a session with an outstanding instructor was well worth it. I shoot it purty well now.

When I first qual'd on the M9 and was younger and brasher, I shot the first familiarization rounds in a reasonably tight off-center group. I honestly can't remember which direction as it was a couple decades ago. I do remember, however, making the remark to the instructor that the sights were off. He took the pistol and put several dead center of the sillhouette, returned it to me, and said some smartass remark before helping me fix my shooting technique.
 

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This is the typical "Is it the arrow or the Indian" thread. Isolate one or the other to determine which one before taking any advice on how to fix it.
 

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This is the typical "Is it the arrow or the Indian" thread. Isolate one or the other to determine which one before taking any advice on how to fix it.
I find that insensitive and offensive... oops, wrong thread. Carry on.
 

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One other thing to think on besides the great advice others have posted is: are you getting consistent groups that are off every time or do they kinda seem to be all over. All over is generally you; nice tight consistent groups, off the aiming point is generally a sight issue. From my experience: physical issues such as grip and trigger control tend to come and go a little with each shot because you are trying to correct things.
 

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Nobody came right out and said it, but if you are right handed and shooting low, left; it is often an indication of jerking the trigger. Not to say it couldn't be the sights or your relative newness to the gun, so the first thing to do is to shoot from a very steady bench rest or have another experienced shooter put some rounds through it to see if the low, left of the POA pattern holds. If it does, adjust the sights, but if it doesn't it is time to work on your technique. Your technique can be refined without ammo and range time by dry fire exercises. Certainly don't give up on it until you've put a lot more rounds down range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the replies. I am shooting 115gr. FMJ. I am shooting consistent groups Left low. I have been used to a horrendous long hard trigger pull with my Kel-Tec and I am sometimes caught by surprise when the trigger breaks on the SA because it is so "clean and easy"
 

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I'm thinking you're jerking the trigger from being used to the Kel Tec.

Mix in some snap caps with your normal ammo and see if you can catch yourself doing it. Gives you a chance to practice malfunction drills too.

Perhaps get in some dry fire practice also.
 

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I totally agree different guns even the same basic type shoot differently. Went to range today was dead on with SP brought out S&W mod 60 was shooting 4 to 5 inches high. After putting 50 rounds through it got much better, same ammo just different gun. Than brought out mk 111 man what a sweet shooter had a ball with it. Even did well with the 380 bodyguard was dead on starting to get more confidence with this one no fte or ftfs in the last 3 to 400 rounds. G17 was perfect as always great nightstand gun.
 

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Post a picture of your target. 25 rounds slow fire at 10 yards with each gun, and I'll tell you if it's the gun or you, as tactful as possible.
 
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