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I work at a College/University and am currently on a hiring committee. We have held several interviews, and one of the applicants emailed me (as well as each of the other committee members) shortly after the interview to say thanks for inviting her to interview for the position. In the letter I received, which I shared with the committee to show that the applicant was applying traditional business practices/etiquette, the applicant thanked me for my service in the USMC. As soon as I shared it, I get the following response (edited for anonymity) from an international committee member/faculty who has been in the country for at least 10 years:

Professor: What does she mean by serving our country???
Me: I was in the United States Marine Corps.
Professor: How does she know that? And why does she feel she needs to refer to this? Do you like that?
Me:It is listed on my biography page: http://www.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
It is recognition of a sacrifice I made for our country. I am very grateful for her support and acknowledgement.
Professor: OK. Is this something that people do when they have interviews? I am just asking.
Me: It is a common courtesy often extended by “the more patriotic” in society.
In my position as xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx I regularly discover that an applicant has a military background as they often ask how the GI Bill (an educational benefit of having served honorably in the US Military) works with our xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx programs. I always offer thanks to service members for the sacrifice they have made to our country.
Me: Furthermore, if I ever find myself in any conversation with someone and it comes up that that person served, I thank them as well. Just call it gratitude.
Professor: Ok. Thanks for letting me know. So, it is a regular occurrence that I was not familiar with.

It just strikes me as weird that after 10 years or so, she has not discovered that some citizens appreciate their service members and are glad to give thanks to those that served.

I don't know much of his/her background, but the accent sounds like its probably Eastern European? Is this sort of patriotism just unheard of in that part of the world? A product of growing up in a (likely) communist regime?
 

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Considering the fact that there are so many US born people who would never think about thanking people for their service, it does not surprise me that this person was not aware of the patriotic custom. You did a very good job of answering her legitimate (for her) questions, and she accepted your explanation well.

And, thank you for your service!
 

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I work at a College/University and am currently on a hiring committee. We have held several interviews, and one of the applicants emailed me (as well as each of the other committee members) shortly after the interview to say thanks for inviting her to interview for the position. In the letter I received, which I shared with the committee to show that the applicant was applying traditional business practices/etiquette, the applicant thanked me for my service in the USMC. As soon as I shared it, I get the following response (edited for anonymity) from an international committee member/faculty who has been in the country for at least 10 years:

Professor: What does she mean by serving our country???
Me: I was in the United States Marine Corps.
Professor: How does she know that? And why does she feel she needs to refer to this? Do you like that?
Me:It is listed on my biography page: http://www.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
It is recognition of a sacrifice I made for our country. I am very grateful for her support and acknowledgement.
Professor: OK. Is this something that people do when they have interviews? I am just asking.
Me: It is a common courtesy often extended by ?the more patriotic? in society.
In my position as xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx I regularly discover that an applicant has a military background as they often ask how the GI Bill (an educational benefit of having served honorably in the US Military) works with our xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx programs. I always offer thanks to service members for the sacrifice they have made to our country.
Me: Furthermore, if I ever find myself in any conversation with someone and it comes up that that person served, I thank them as well. Just call it gratitude.
Professor: Ok. Thanks for letting me know. So, it is a regular occurrence that I was not familiar with.

It just strikes me as weird that after 10 years or so, she has not discovered that some citizens appreciate their service members and are glad to give thanks to those that served.

I don't know much of his/her background, but the accent sounds like its probably Eastern European? Is this sort of patriotism just unheard of in that part of the world? A product of growing up in a (likely) communist regime?
Thank you for your service and Semper Fi Devil. You shouldn't have to explain that to someone its absurd. But don't sweat it too much Marine a lot of civillians don't understand the sacrifices especially those of being a grunt.
 

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I'll take a shot. Most nations around the world have conscript military service. While many citizens of countries that have such services do acknowledge the sacrifice made by all who serve, many others do not.

I think remembering how our own service members, even those conscripted, were treated by a very vocal percentage of our population as they returned home from Vietnam, highlights how refreshing the words really are to those who serve. The image of screaming, spitting, cursing cries of "baby killer" from those who really thought their open hatred of those who served was somehow appropriate, will only be forgotten when the last of my generation is laid to rest.

In the meantime, thank you for your service, Marine.
 

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I think you would have to look at the people your dealing with in that situation. Thank you for your service. Semper Fi
 

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Considering the fact that there are so many US born people who would never think about thanking people for their service, it does not surprise me that this person was not aware of the patriotic custom.
Part of the reason is that over 90% of these US born people have never served and don't give the military much thought unless it's something that makes the news. The exact statistic of those who actually serve is SO low it's scary.
 

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You're probably right about her nation of birth; not every military deserves the respect of its citizens like ours does. She might have also thought that it amounted to brownnosing in the context of an interview, not realizing that it's a common courtesy. Like if the applicant had complimented your hair or something else unrelated to the position.
 

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I don't know much of his/her background, but the accent sounds like its probably Eastern European? Is this sort of patriotism just unheard of in that part of the world? A product of growing up in a (likely) communist regime?
I'd be curious of here age. Although I was serving in Germany at the end of the cold war and patrolled the border, I didn't have a lot of understanding on the mentality on the other side. I would assume most of the soldiers in the Eastern Bloc were not volunteers and were selected/mandated to serve and it was probably just seen as an expectation. The fact that we are an all volunteer army plays a big part in the "Thank you for your service" mentality in the US.

So, for a person over 50, I would expect they wouldn't think about serving as a sacrifice but more of an expectation. And, even since the wall came down I do't know what all the former soviet union countries do today. It could be that service may be a requirement for all citizens as it is in many countries.
 

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Nothing wrong with a thank you. It takes two seconds. I believe this small gesture helps unify us as citizens in a small way, and we certainly need more of that. I am grateful when someone thanks me and I thank those who make, or have made, a choice to put themselves in harm's way. I extend that to those in law enforcement, firemen, etc.

So, thank you for your service to our country, my friend.
 

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Sir I too would like to Thank You for your service and sacrifice. You say this person seems to be Eastern European so she may be used to military service as mandatory instead of volunteer. Where she is from being former military may be something most people may not be proud of. Again Thank You.
 

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She's blatantly ignorant. Even the cashier at Hommie D thanks me for my service when I get my 10% discount.
 

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Semper Fi! Aside from her country of birth, you have those who have spent their entire lives in the closed loop of academia. I have a cousin who did just that. Once she got her Masters, she went to work at the university while she earned her PHD, then immediately got a teaching position at the same university. In that closed ecosystem the concepts of patriotism, service, and personal sacrifice are virtually unheard of, much less understood.
 

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She wasn't insulting any one. She just didn't know, and now she does. Lots of vets don't talk about it with anyone not a vet and it's easy to just not know. If you only meet someone in a work environment, you are not looking for personal history.
Nothing here to get upset over. It was a learning experience. There will not be a test.
 

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In some foreign countries, "military service" is tantamount to aiding & abetting puppet dictators to the serious peril of the general citizenry. If this accredited "professor" had even a vague understanding of the U.S. Constitution or even a "Cliff's Notes" version of American History, the reason for your resume line-item would be self-evident. As it is, the professor's...ignorance is showing. :blink:
 

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She wasn't insulting any one. She just didn't know, and now she does. Lots of vets don't talk about it with anyone not a vet and it's easy to just not know. If you only meet someone in a work environment, you are not looking for personal history.
Nothing here to get upset over. It was a learning experience. There will not be a test.
I'm with you on this one. As a guy who's lived in 6 countries and traveled quite a bit, it's important to note that in many countries citizens view their military as a necessary evil. Some of them have left to come here because of military rule. I'm pretty sure the first thing I would have asked her was, "Where are you from? And how long exactly have you been here?"

Anyway, I can see the reason for the questioning as a person who's hired at times. She's trying to figure out if the applicant is trying to manipulate you. That's fair.

All that said - 10 years! I mean she should know this already. She must be a real hermit, or a complete tool. I mean we have the military recognized at events all the time - over loud speakers. I've been to countless University graduations for the love of Pete where they do this even.

Look - an idiot she might be. But there are idiots everywhere.
 

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First, thank you for your service! Now welcome to the "liberal arts" culture:rolleyes:! For example; if you had been at the Citadel this conversation probably would have never happened! Carry on!
 
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