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There is a reason almost all states require youngsters to take driving lessons before they can get a driving permit. That is the same reason people NEED LESSONS before they buy their first gun.

Both things are dangerous and if you do not follow all the safety rules and get the proper training, you can get killed - or "accidentally" kill someone else.
 

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People are conditioned to fear guns as part of the anti gun agenda.
 

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Might I ask your consideration of a few issues before I answer?

Consider the horrifying knife. In the wrong hands, it can slit your throat or penetrate your vital organs. In the right hands, it can cut out a cancer or give a surgeon access to repair a heart and save your life.

Consider the terrifying baseball bat. In the wrong hands, it can crush a skull. In the right hands it can thrill a crowd.

Now picture a knife and baseball bat lying side by side on your coffee table. Don't allow any human contact with either item for a full hour. Now ask yourself, "Did the knife cut me or the baseball bat kill me?" I strongly suspect neither one moved so much as an inch.

I would suggest that if you performed the same experiment with a loaded gun on the coffee table and likewise restricted any human contact, it would not hurt you either.

Are you beginning to see that it isn't WHAT you should fear, but WHO?

Now what are you afraid of again?
 

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Might I ask your consideration of a few issues before I answer?

Consider the horrifying knife. In the wrong hands, it can slit your throat or penetrate your vital organs. In the right hands, it can cut out a cancer or give a surgeon access to repair a heart and save your life.

Consider the terrifying baseball bat. In the wrong hands, it can crush a skull. In the right hands it can thrill a crowd.

Now picture a knife and baseball bat lying side by side on your coffee table. Don't allow any human contact with either item for a full hour. Now ask yourself, "Did the knife cut me or the baseball bat kill me?" I strongly suspect neither one moved so much as an inch.

I would suggest that if you performed the same experiment with a loaded gun on the coffee table and likewise restricted any human contact, it would not hurt you either.

Are you beginning to see that it isn't WHAT you should fear, but WHO?

Now what are you afraid of again?
I'm still going with the knife.
 

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I feared guns until I was six years old in 1952. I was raised in a no gun home. A family friend taught me to safely handle and shoot with a .22 single-action revolver. After that, I have had a healthy respect for a gun's capability to damage. I also feared motorcycles until I learned to ride one. I also have a healthy respect for the damage they can do. If you ever get complacent with riding a motorcycle or handling a gun, that is when accidents or deaths occur.
 

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I fear NEITHER knives or gun's. They are a tool.
 

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People fear the projection of power... It is that simple. When Vladimir Lenin said, "One man with a gun can control 100 without one.", he was talking about the projection of power that a gun conveys to people. you can't quite say the same thing about a knife.
 
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I fear NEITHER knives or gun's. They are a tool.
Take that knife out of the man's hand and he can't slice you into bacon and leave you bleeding.
 
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I think the OP's post is directed to the bearer of the weapon, not the person the weapon is being used against.

My own personal view is that a person who holds a gun for the very first time and that does not feel at least a small amount of fear of the lethality that can come a small mistake is a fool.
 

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Fearing the unknown is a primal instinct. If you are raised around guns, and/or learned how to use them the right way, your fear becomes respect. I've been shooting since I was 9, bought my first gun at 14, learned how to shoot well in the military... but I was still quite queasy when I started carrying which was just 7 years ago.

Now, I'm queasy if I accidentally leave my carry weapon at home or are forced by the law not to have it (e.g, when going to a military base to shop).

Get good training, practice practice practice, observe safety rules, and make good choices in your purchased guns, and you will grow out of any fear.
 

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I am just the opposite. I fear knives more than guns.
In 1992 I was enlightened by this, its dated but still applicable.
Attacker with a knife inside 21 ft is lethal threat.
 

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Go to a range, shoot some guns, get some understanding of them. It's human nature to be afraid of things we don't understand.
 
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Fear is natural. It’s what you do with it.
i might fear a guy with a gun or knife.
But that won’t stop me from doing what needs to be done.
 

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Wounds are caused by energy; with most weapons (and tools) the energy is supplied by the body of the user. With firearms, the energy is stored in the ammunition, and the user only actuates a control to release it. This makes them more dangerous in inexperienced hands.

As with power tools and cars, a person learns how to use them until they can use them with cautious confidence. Until they do, it's very appropriate to be nervous about handling them.
 
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I think the fear of firearms has several relevant facets to it.
First, Hollywood has presented guns as having almost mythical powers. When someone gets hit by a bullet they go flying. When cars get hit they explode. Reality does not have an effects budget and crew. Visually real world shootings are much less dramatic. In real world it is frequently hard to tell if or when someone even gets hit by a bullet.

Second is unfamiliarity. Without this the Hollywood factor would not exist. When people actually see what a bullet does the Hollywood mythology dies.

Third I think, is the instantaneous effect. When you accidentally cut your finger while slicing onions or something you can usually stop before you have amputated you finger. Not so with a firearm. Once the sear is tripped it is essentially a done deal. There is no stopping the event until it reaches it's natural conclusion. Most people have a comfort zone with things they can stop at will. The longer they have to stop it the more control they have over it.
 

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One show that tests various stunts and highlights how much of what Hollywood shows is purely effects is Hollywood Weapons. They have shown how some stunts are actually possible, but how most are not. It's entertainment and educational.

The guys in the show are goofy, and having fun as they test things. In a very safe manner.
 

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Make a mistake with a knife, worst case is you need a few stitches.

Make a mistake with a gun, worst case is your brains or someone else's brains are splattered against a wall.

Knife safety prevents you from injuring yourself.

Gun safety prevents you from killing yourself or someone else.

A gun is a far more dangerous instrumentality that any other hand tool.

It's good to have a very healthy respect for guns. What you should fear is yourself with the gun, until you know how to handle and use the gun safely.

Practice with it. Know the four rules of gun safety and the reason for each rule:
  • All guns are always loaded.
  • Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
  • Keep your finger off the trigger till your sights are on the target.
  • Identify your target, and what is behind it.
(If this is your first gun and it is for home defense, I recommend a S&W 686+ with a 4" barrel. That was my first handgun and it's still my home defense gun.)
I just want everyone to have a chance to read this post again.

Bravado aside, gun accidents can happen very quickly and can have fatal consequences. Knife accidents are not pleasant, but usually do not have as high of consequences.
 

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Faster with a 36” piece of hickory then I’ll ever be with a gun or knife.
Guaranteed to do as much damaged as a knife or gun.
Always in the hand deployed in half a second or less
 

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It has probably been said already, but I’ll say it again, guns are constantly being advertised as deadly weapons on the news, social media, television programs, so folks just develop the opinion that guns are bad and tend to avoid them. Even gun aficionados on this forum refer to guns that way.
IMO, this is an unfair label being placed on firearms. After all, there are MANY inanimate objects that can be used as a deadly weapon, yet only guns are commonly tainted with this label.
 

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I still have a healthy fear of flying! Even though I don't know anyone who has crashed in a plane and know several hundred that fly successfully every day. I still get White Knuckled and quiet on take off and landings.
But I can't remember the first time I fired a gun! They have been there every day, all my life.
Like stated above, try to get into a training class. Some will provide several guns for you to try. And instruction on how each works. Just like learning to drive, it's not something you want to just wing it! I learned by watching my parents and grandparents, How they handled guns and ammo. I also learned the things not to do by listening to their story's.
The OP did not have that , So hopefully you will find someone to help you along, and maybe your wife and kids will grow up thinking they are just normal tools dad had. Even if they don't grow up to be gun nuts, they won't have that fear! They can save that for being afraid of flying! Good Luck DR

Not to steal the thread but.......Actually you do. In 1995 my best friend and I were on a fly-in Caribou hunt in SW Alaska. We both were living in Fairbanks and this was my last hunt before being transferred back to Fort Bragg. We were dropped off by float-plane for a week long trip. It was a great trip, we both got our "bous" and had our gear and meat at the lakeside when the pilot came to pick us up in a Turbine Stretched Dehavilland Beaver on floats.

I won't frighten you with the rest of the details, but it involved us coming down out of socked-in weather between mountain peaks and hitting a lake surface unexpectedly and tearing the bottom of one of the floats. (I still have a back injury from the impact). I actually have it on video from inside the cockpit, as my guts were telling me that stuff was getting pretty western...... We miraculously stayed airborne because we bounced or skipped so high from hitting the surface that the pilot was able to power out.

He went to another lake where they had fuel cached and when he touched down the float filled with water and started to sink us. He couldn't get airborne again but gave it full throttle and kept making doughnuts in the lake trying to beach the plane before we sank. My friend and I were starting to take gear off in preparation for a swim in a late September Alaskan lake. I was trying to decide if I could make it with my .44 mag in the shoulder holster. He was finally able to beach it. Then we had to chase off a grizz that smelled the meat in the plane. We were eventually flown out by another plane.
 
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