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Is this for self defense or target shooting???
 

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Good question 1911srule! I was fillin'-in details w/o KNOWING the answer to that very important question. :yup:
My buddy and I got in a disagreement over this. He bought his wife a S&W 22 snub revolver for self defense. I told him it was giving her a false sense of security. Teach her on a 22 and move up on to a realistic defensive caliber. Teach until shes proficient and has a good mind set. Then have her carry. I hope this thread is about target shooting...
 

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If you do get a Ruger Mark IV Lite, be sure to see my thread about their recall. I just went on their web site and filled out the form. They will do all the rest including sending me a box and label to ship the bottom half of my New one back to them to be fixed. Not a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Is this for self defense or target shooting???
Target.. she has Sig P238 as her every day carry, but .380 is not that cheap for putting holes in paper..
She seems to like my 22/45 a lot at the range,, and i told her we'd get her her own .22.
She is 64 and has severe arthritis in her hands and fingers, and there are very few guns she can handle ok. She needs something easy to load, rack and fire.
She does ok with her P 238, and the 22/45 as well, but the 22/45 is pretty heavy with its long steel barrel.

I will let her try a few .22's and see what she likes,,, bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
My buddy and I got in a disagreement over this. He bought his wife a S&W 22 snub revolver for self defense. I told him it was giving her a false sense of security. Teach her on a 22 and move up on to a realistic defensive caliber. Teach until shes proficient and has a good mind set. Then have her carry. I hope this thread is about target shooting...
I dunno, a .22 with CCI's is no joke.. I sure as hell would back up fast if one was pointed at me.. its not an ideal SD weapon, but its WAY better than a nail file or pepper spray... bob
 

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I dunno, a .22 with CCI's is no joke.. I sure as hell would back up fast if one was pointed at me.. its not an ideal SD weapon, but its WAY better than a nail file or pepper spray... bob
Yes but besides shot placement, stopping power matters too. The quicker you put 'em down, the longer you may live. Funny note-Yesterday I shot a zombie chipmunk at 15 yds with a 22 pistol using CCI standard velocity 40 gr bullet. The bullet entered top of the forehead , traveled a total of about 4-5 inches down the back without exiting. Not my pick for self defense on a human unless its all I had.
 

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Since its for target, why not. 10rd .22 revolver? I don't know about the weight but the racking issue is taken off the table entirely.
 

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I've been real happy with my Browning 1911-22 Black Label. It's the little brother to my other 1911's in 45 ACP but this one I can afford to shoot more. A lot more! Only downside I've found is the price. At 85% the size of a full size 1911 I would of though it would of been 15% less expensive.
 

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My wife wanted a .22. I gave her a divorce. Last I've heard, she's still wanting a .22.

On the serious side, Browning's 1911 22 is the way to go. It's a miniature 1911. However, I'd never use a .22LR for self-defense except for small jackalopes. The bigger, meaner ones need a .44 Mag. I've heard of real bad jackalopes needing numerous RPG rounds to stop.

Try this: 1911-22
 

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this is one time I would recommend a revolver like a 442 or 642 no slide to rack, .38 SP which is a lot better than a .22 LR.
Key word: ARTHRITIS! Revolvers have stiffer trigger pulls and .38 special (even light loads) have more recoil. This never was a problem for me BEFORE. When I say BEFORE I mean just two years ago!

Now it takes both trigger fingers to pull the trigger on my wonderful old S&W Model 10 pencil barrel which has a light trigger pull for a revolver, and now the recoil is a serious problem for me. The same is true for my S&W 686 revolver which has one of the best action jobs available in the specialty after market business - and a "butter smooth" trigger.

I can still use my G42's but only with a Handi Racker to get the slide back to slide lock. It was no problem at all before.

People who do not have advanced arthritis have no idea at all what it means in terms of what guns a person can use - even for plinking!

My new SIG P238 is a good gun for me because I can rack the slide all by myself and with shooting gloves I can manage the recoil. So far I can still use my Bersa BP380cc, sometimes using the Handi Racker.

My Glock 17 is still my bedside house gun and I "can" shoot it but I pay for doing so with pain in both hands for a couple days after shooting one full magazine.

My new Ruger Mark IV is an excellent plinking gun for me and I will be very happy when I get that box to return it to Ruger for the retrofit. Sad now because it is not safe to use it until then.
 

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I have a PAC lite barrel on my mk3 and it's very lightweight. If she likes the mk3 design I would recommend going that route.
 

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My new Ruger Mark IV is an excellent plinking gun for me and I will be very happy when I get that box to return it to Ruger for the retrofit. Sad now because it is not safe to use it until then.
I read the notice and it seems the problem was with pulling the trigger when the safety was on, then flicking the safety off. I only do that when function testing a safety. I wouldn't have a problem shooting it, but that's me.
I'm surprised you don't have the box yet. I wonder if Ruger is staggering them so they don't get a thousand Mk IV's in for repair at the same time.
 

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I read the notice and it seems the problem was with pulling the trigger when the safety was on, then flicking the safety off. I only do that when function testing a safety. I wouldn't have a problem shooting it, but that's me.
I'm surprised you don't have the box yet. I wonder if Ruger is staggering them so they don't get a thousand Mk IV's in for repair at the same time.
I would also feel safe, but that's just me as well. Until I sent it back I'd leave it on fire and shoot the heck out of it. If there's anything else wrong with it (low probability, but still possible) it would be good to know and could be repaired at the same time as the safety recall.
 

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I agree with the statement that Arthritis is the key word here. Her hands may hurt from racking a big slide, or she cannot rack it at all, and her arthritis will never go away. As we age, we have to learn to live with the weight of so many heavy birthday candles on our cake. I compliment her on wanting to continue in shooting and not give up because of the pain in her hands. I agree that a revolver will not be the answer because of the heavy trigger pull. A 22 LR usually has a more powerful mainspring than a comparable centerfire gun, because of the less reliable primer ignition.
 

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I read the notice and it seems the problem was with pulling the trigger when the safety was on, then flicking the safety off. I only do that when function testing a safety. I wouldn't have a problem shooting it, but that's me.
I'm surprised you don't have the box yet. I wonder if Ruger is staggering them so they don't get a thousand Mk IV's in for repair at the same time.
The problem is with the safety, but not when it is all the way on or off - it tends to get stuck half way and that is when the sudden discharge can happen without pulling the trigger. Mine was doing that, sometimes when attempting to load the first round from a new magazine - and the charger would also stop half way. I thought it was a "learning to use a different gun problem."

One other person has commented that hers was doing the same safety half off thing.

Yes, they are staggering them and the web site says requests will be processed in order of being received through their web site. I think that is how they can predict that you will (should?) get your gun back in about a week.

For me, I will wait. I have other guns to shoot, just not another .22. Maybe this means I should buy that M&P .22 compact semi auto that I thought I didn't like? LOL
 

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I already have a Ruger 22/45, and its simply the best .22 I have ever used, Light trigger, super easy to rack and operate, and by far my most accurate handgun by a big margin. Eats any crap ammo i throw in it, and always cycles flawlessly. So smooth..
I am talking my wife into a nice .22 for herself thats not so big and heavy as mine..
She operates the 22/45 very well even with her very severe arthritis, and shoots it very accurately.
However,for all its great attributes, the 22/45 is a big heavy gun for a .22 LR.. Almost comically so, for a small woman.
What I would like to find is a somewhat smaller ,somewhat shorter barreled .22 thats just as smooth and user friendly as the 22/45.
She shoots all our guns well, but I can tell she is interested in a .22 of her own, tailored more to her limited hand strength and agility.
We had a walther .22 that was not too awful except it refused to cycle anything but tip top of the line .22 LR rounds.. If you dared try to run plain old bulk .22 target ammo, it jammed, stovepiped, and refused to cycle every round or two...
Any ideas on a really good .22 semi auto for a woman thats smaller and lighter than a 22/45???...... bob
A woman in our concealed carry class asked me if she could try to rack my LCP and then she told me that she didn't have the strength to work the slide. She asked me if I knew of any handguns that were easier to use and I told her that I didn't really know a lot about all of the guns. So I wondered what you and your wife found out? Did you find anything?
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
A woman in our concealed carry class asked me if she could try to rack my LCP and then she told me that she didn't have the strength to work the slide. She asked me if I knew of any handguns that were easier to use and I told her that I didn't really know a lot about all of the guns. So I wondered what you and your wife found out? Did you find anything?
The LCP Custom was the first gun my wife carried after she got her unrestricted carry permit.. At first she could handle it of.. Within one short year, she no longer could use it at all, and we bought her a Sig P238.. No more racking issues... Well, not for a few months anyway. Now about 6 months down the road, she is having serious problems handing the Sig as her arthritis seems to get worse by the day.
Now she can only rack the slide if the hammer is back already, and I have to do that for her...
She is losing the battle, and I [and she] have my doubts about her ability to carry in the future.. She shoots very well at the range, but simply can't handle the hardware to get the gun ready to fire..

As for your classmate, at this point I would tell her to try a Sig P238.. It really is substantially easier to rack than an LCP.. I don't think there is anything out there any easier to rack or fire... My Ruger 22/45 is easy to use even with my wife's awful arthritis , but its a .22 and its huge and heavy, NOT a carry gun by any means..
 
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