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I don't believe so, either.

I do advise my students to promptly inform during "official" encounters with LE in Ohio, but as far as I know, "must inform" does not extend to one's own private residence.
I would certainly think not.
This case is ludicrous. One hopes it gets tossed out of court ASAP.
 

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She will get millions in settlement with a good lawyer. Hope she makes it hurt for the jurisdiction.
Jurisdictions don't care, cities don't care, homeowners are the ones who pay for it.
 

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Indeed... just another example of the heavy handed robotic minions of the state that are so highly respected on this forum... To them, its an honor to harass this unfortunate citizen.
oh by the way, she will probably lose the case... Lots of leftist, constitution despising ""judges"" out there that will side with "law enforcement" in ANY case involving a gun, even when it is 100% unconstitutional...
 

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This cannot stand, rather obviously, but only if the defendant is willing and able to sustain a defense. That will require many thousands of dollars in legal fees and costs, and also take many months or a few years in the court system, as long as there is a prosecutor willing to continue pushing the case.

Unfortunately, many people in such situations find it advantageous to "cop a plea", take a deal that allows them to walk away with little or no consequences (fines, jail time, etc). But, once a person takes the deal there can be no appeal because the plea bargain includes a plea of guilty to some criminal act (no matter how unconstitutional it might be). With very few exceptions, a guilty plea places the defendant in a world beyond any further legal action or consideration.

I hope that this person stands up against the case against her. I hope that her family, friends, and Ohio gun owners in general pitch in to fund her defense. I would be willing to send a contribution.

Even so, she will face many months of life with a pending criminal charge, always planning her schedule around legal meetings, depositions, court hearings, etc. It will be a devastating event in her life, and I hope she will come through it without succumbing to the temptation for surrender.
 

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Ohio House Bill 89, which removes notification, was passed out of committee on 3/9/2021. Republican House Speaker Bob Cupp refuses to bring the bill to the floor for a vote.
 

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Looking at the link rtrora provided, it appears she was charged with Carrying a Concealed Weapon, not Failure to Inform.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Looking at the link rtrora provided, it appears she was charged with Carrying a Concealed Weapon, not Failure to Inform.
Interesting, that has even less weight than the failure to notify. There is no such thing as concealed carry in your own home, as far as I know you can do as you please up to and including having loaded weapons sitting in the open on a table..

If the courts win on this, then any officer that comes into your home could potentially charge you for concealed carry even if your guns are locked in a safe.
 

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This "duty to inform" makes me somewhat nervous if I happen to be standing in line next to a uniformed officer at a grocery store or a restaurant. Technically, it's not an official contact situation but I don't see any difference between that scenario or a traffic stop. So, this is a "grey area" of the law for me.
If he hasn't made verbal contact with you, let it be and don't inform. If he does make verbal contact with him, unless he can articulate his reasons (RAS, PC), you needn't answer his questions or speak with him.
 

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This "duty to inform" makes me somewhat nervous if I happen to be standing in line next to a uniformed officer at a grocery store or a restaurant. Technically, it's not an official contact situation but I don't see any difference between that scenario or a traffic stop. So, this is a "grey area" of the law for me.
Your state's law makes it pretty clear and I don't see grey:

Nebraska Legislature The last paragraph nails it.
 

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If he hasn't made verbal contact with you, let it be and don't inform. If he does make verbal contact with him, unless he can articulate his reasons (RAS, PC), you needn't answer his questions or speak with him.
Well, is saying "Hello" verbal contact? Duty to inform needs to go. Someone that intends to do harm isn't going to volunteer any information anyway.
 

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If he hasn't made verbal contact with you, let it be and don't inform. If he does make verbal contact with him, unless he can articulate his reasons (RAS, PC), you needn't answer his questions or speak with him.
You've moved Ohio's must inform requirement to an entirely different discussion. The law says nothing about verbal contact.
 

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But if you attribute something to malice and stupidity, you have all your bases covered!

What is the simplest explanation for women wearing burqas? Achmed's Razor!
Malice and stupidity aren't necessarily mutually exclusive, for sure.
 

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Well, is saying "Hello" verbal contact? Duty to inform needs to go. Someone that intends to do harm isn't going to volunteer any information anyway.
Again, the goal posts of must inform have been moved significantly in your example.
 

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Well, is saying "Hello" verbal contact? Duty to inform needs to go. Someone that intends to do harm isn't going to volunteer any information anyway.
Per NE law: For purposes of this section, contact with a peace officer means any time a peace officer personally stops, detains, questions, or addresses a permitholder for an official purpose or in the course of his or her official duties, and contact with emergency services personnel means any time emergency services personnel provide treatment to a permitholder in the course of their official duties.

I don't think anyone would expect a casual, courteous "Hello" to meet the standard stated in the statute. Hello is not official course of official duty. Until he starts asking question or for ID, it's a friendly exchange of conversation.
 

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I've never understood the rationale for the duty to inform.

Officer safety? The criminal will ignore the law. The law abiding citizen is not a threat. So no, not really office safety.

Most of these statutes are can be used as traps on law abiding citizens - what does "promptly" or "immediately" mean?

Example:
Officer: Do you know why I stopped you?
Driver: Uh, no.
Officer: Okay, clocked you going 7 over. License, registration and proof of insurance please.
Driver: Sure, I need to open the glove box, okay?
Officer: Okay, thanks for letting me know.
Driver: One more thing, per state law, I need to inform you that I'm a license carrier and I am carrying right now, it's at 3:30, how do you want to handle it?

Question: Did the drive violate the law? Did he "promptly" or "immediately" inform the officer?

These laws are a mess.
 
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