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If you are speaking of knife sharpeners I personally don't use either. I use an old school stone....either Arkansas or Norton India Stone.
 
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If you are speaking of knife sharpeners I personally don't use either. I use an old school stone....either Arkansas or Norton India Stone.
I find that I can get a finer edge with them as opposed to other methods.
 

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I've had a Lansky kit for quite a while. It does a fine job. I really only use it for repairing a damaged blade or cutting a new bevel on a new blade as it is fairly cumbersome to set up and use. I use a cheap Harbor Freight four sided diamond "stone" for my daily maintenance tasks.

I have not used the Edge Pro so I can't speak of it, but It would have to be much easier to set up and be of extremely high quality before I would spend that kind of money when the Lansky is so affordable.

Now that I have shown my frugal side, I am going to purchase the Wicked Edge Pro system in the near future. It is extremely pricey but it is easily set up and of extremely high quality.
 

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Jason, what are you sharpening? High-end chef's knives, mid-grade bushcraft knives, budget machetes or lawn mower blades? I've got Lansky, Spyderco, Buck (Honemaster), Smith's, etc., etc. My experience is that different systems & abrasives work better for different cutting requirements.

And, to answer your question, the Spyderco is easy & effective to use.
 

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I hesitated, debated and waited and thought some more - then I finally bit the bullet and got a spyderco sharp maker, just do it - it is fantastic.
 

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Jason, what are you sharpening? High-end chef's knives, mid-grade bushcraft knives, budget machetes or lawn mower blades? I've got Lansky, Spyderco, Buck (Honemaster), Smith's, etc., etc. My experience is that different systems & abrasives work better for different cutting requirements.

And, to answer your question, the Spyderco is easy & effective to use.
Kitchen, edc, survival. That's a wide variety. One probably won't do for all. I do have the schrade advantedge but am not happy with it. I like the system just not the results.

-Jason
 

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Then take a look at the Spyderco Sharpmaker. It's now my go-to, general use knife sharpener. Economically priced, fast set-up. It won't magically turn chicken crap into chicken salad, but it gets used more than the fancier systems I have.
 

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go to walmart and get one of the 3.00 dollar smith's sharpeners.... they are great for throwing in a pack, in a drawer or even a pocket. With regular maintenance they will keep any knife super sharp. I use it on my EDC knives, kitchen knives, hunting knives and limbing machete as well. For a high end sharpener, the spyderco is a great sharpener.
 

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You are comparing apples to oranges. Edge Pro $250 +; Lansky, $50 + ?? Different systems................

Look at Wicked Edge too if you're dropping $200 +.

I'd like a Edge Pro or WE, but am looking at a Sharpmaker right now.
 

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I've used the Lansky system for about ten years now and it has worked pretty well but I do have some problems with it.

1. You can only sharpen a small section of blade at a time. the system requires you to move the clamp in order to maintain the same angle. So, good for small blades, not so much for larger.

2. The metal guide rods are made of aluminum which tends to get bent easily, In fact, I initially had to straighten mine by hand so they would maintain a consistent angle. This is a real problem and can run from difficult to impossible depending on your knowledge, time , resources, and ingenuity.

3. the stones wear over time so mine now are dished and need flattening or replacing; that's probably going to be true of any stone-based system.

If I were buying a Lansky now I would not consider anything other than diamond stones.
 
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If you buy the Lansky (which works quite well) then get the Diamond Hone kit and use Very Little pressure. Almost just the weight of the hones.
 

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I use the WORKSHARP and I am very happy with it.

It's so easy that it's breezy to sharpen knives.

One thing though - until you use it a bit you might need to remake your knife point...which is no big deal at all but, I am just making you aware of that fact.

Once you sharpen a few knives that will no longer be an issue.

Basically it is SO EASY to get a hair popping edge that you could train a chimpanzee to do it.

I bought mine on Ebay and I think I bought mine back then for $50.00 Buy It Now and a reasonable shipping charge - $6.00 or thereabouts.

There are more than a few YouTube Videos on it but, here is a decent and fairly short one.

I have a Lansky Diamond and I always liked it but, I have not used it since I bought the WORKSHARP.

 

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It really depends on what you're going to do with the sharpener, how many knives you'll do per month, etc. The Edge Pro is the best sharpening device for knives that I know of, period. The Wicked Edge (WEPS) is also very good with some strengths and weaknesses. Both are superior to the Lansky/Gatco type rig.

First off, the EP (Edge Pro) isn't cheap. The Apex starts at around $165 for a very basic setup; the Edge Pro Professional model is over $400. That said, it's very capable. Either EP will allow you to get every possible iota of sharpness out of a blade that it's capable of. I own an EP Professional and use it to maintain my kitchen knives. I'm a professional chef, and my most expensive knife is an $800 Japanese gyuto. If you have very good knives it's well worth the money.

Some strengths of the EP:
1) Precision- You can adjust the EP to the precise angle you want on the knife to a fraction of a degree. You can maintain the angle from heel to tip over the entire blade. There's virtually no wobble or error, giving you an unbelievably sharp edge.
2) Repeatability- Every time you sharpen you can lock in to the precise angle you used last time.
3) Minimal metal removal- Since you're running the stone arm by hand, and very precisely, you will remove the absolute minimum amount of metal possible. It's like the old sculpture saying he doesn't carve an elephant, he just removes everything that isn't an elephant from around it! I also have a very good 1" x 42" belt grinder that I use for sharpening and repairs; no matter how carefully you run a grinder, a powered machine is going to remove more metal than you will by hand.
4) Short learning curve- Unlike totally freehanding, the EP is relatively easy to learn. If you're strongly right/left handed it will probably take a dozen knives or so to the hang of flipping the blade over to use your off hand. In that sense it's a bit like shooting. But it's easily learned.
5) Great if you're unsteady or disabled- My dad had pretty much blown his right shoulder up to the point where he couldn't hold a coffee cup in it, but the EP Apex let him steady everything enough to get sharp knives.
6) Stone variety- Unlike the Lansky there are perhaps a hundred or more available stones. I personally have 8 diamond plates from DMT & Atoma, maybe 50 Japanese sythnetic water stones and a dozen rare Japanese natural stones set up for the EP. Waterstones are generally superior for most things, but diamonds are great for reprofiling. There are also coticules and Arkansas stones available.

Some weaknesses of the EP:
1) Cost- It's a good value but there are cheaper methods out there.
2) Skill- The EP does help but you have to understand sharpening theory. It's easy to learn but you have to understand burr formation and how sharpening generally works.
3) Blade table- Since the blade table is flat, it takes some practice to sharpen goofy shaped knives with lots of different bevels and grinds. Full flat grinds are easiest to sharpen (which I prefer anyways). A zero convex grind will give you fits until you get the process down.
4) Learning curve- Again, it's not rocket science but there is a curve. Using the EP is a lot like chess; it's easy to learn the rules well enough to play a game but you could spend your life mastering it. I've been into knives and sharpening for a over 25 years and do some professional sharpening. I have an EP Pro and after using it for years I still feel like I'm learning stuff.

The WEPS is another good tool, but the main strength is also the weakness. By that I mean the clamp. It holds the knife so using the system is totally idiot proof but it also limits what knives will fit. Some shapes are hard to clamp and there's a max length that you can do without unclamping and moving the knife. That's the main problem with the Lansky- you just get going and then you have to unclamp to move the knife. With the EP you learn to smoothly, fluidly move the knife over the table.

The Work Sharp is an interesting tool but I think it has a few issues. First, the belts are non-standard and proprietary. Basically you have to buy them from the company that makes them. And they don't offer an awful lot of variety. Enough to do a good job on most knives but not a lot of room to "geek out." Powered sharpeners always remove more metal than hand sharpeners, and carry the risk of overheating the blade. The main issue to me is that for the cost of a WorkSharp you could buy a basic 30" x 1" machine and spend an extra hour to learn to freehand on belts. There are hundreds of belts for 30" x 1", starting at just a buck or two each.

The Lansky/Gatco systems are okay but pretty limited. Not a lot of different stones. They both work best for folders and shorter knives where you don't have to move the clamp.

The Spyderco Tri-Angle Sharpmaker is a good tool but really only for knives in decent shape. It takes forever to do stuff like work out chips or sharpen very dull knives (even with the diamond rods). Also, there are only a couple of angles built into the device. It's really a "steel on steroids" IMOHO but it's good to spiff up blades between trips to the stones.

Even if you get an Edge Pro (and if you're a knife nerd you should!) you still might consider a belt grinder down the road. It's great for making repairs that you'd never attempt by hand. For instance, I can take very large chips out of a knife in just a couple minutes. I can also use a grinder to replace broke tips in under 5 minutes. I love sharpening on water stones but I don't know what I'd do without my belt grinder!

Well, that got a bit long!:redface: Sorry, I'm just a bit of a sharpening geek. In addition to working as a chef I moonlight as a sharpening. I sharpen for chefs, restaurants and have done some sharpening of new knives for a large online cutlery store. Just giving a bit of background on what I think of the various systems.
 
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Not too long at all. Sometimes it takes a bit longer to thoroughly explore possibilities, pros and cons. I appreciate your input and experience as I've been giving some thought to a better system myself.
 

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Thanks. Here's a picture of my EP with a marble basin I had custom made to my specs by Jende Industries LLC.

eponjendepond2cc.jpg
 

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Looks very handsome, and stable too.
 
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