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Yesterday, I went to the local in door range since it was raining here in Houston. I usually go to the outdoor range, where you stand shoulder to should in the shooting lanes and I keep to myself and don't "give advice" when not asked. I just don't want to be one of "those guys" that are going up and down the range telling people how to shoot. However, yesterday I could not help myself. There was this nice lady shooting next to me when I was about 2 mags left of ammo. While taking a break, I was watching her and based on her handling of her handgun, I new she was a noob. It looked like she literally took the handgun out of the box for the first time while getting ready in the lane next to me. The handgun was a Ruger LC380 with the DA hammer. I always kind of watch new shooters for safety reason (mine not theirs), so I was watching her while taking a little break. She loaded the mag ok, but road the slide causing the firearm not to go into battery. She then went to fire the gun and I tapped her on the shoulder to explain the slide did not go all the way forward. After clearing the firearm and then a brief conversation about just releasing the slide to allow it to go home forcefully, she was ready to go. So, that is what she did and ready herself to send a round down range, but I noticed her grip. She had wrapped her support (left) hand around her right hand (like a revolver grip) which I noticed her thumb was in the perfect place for a slide bite. Before she pressed the trigger, I tapped her on the shoulder again to stop her from firing. I did not want her to get a gouge taken out of her thumb. This time, I asked more questions about her handgun experience and yes, she just bought the firearm the day before for "protection".

So at this point, I asked her if she would mine if I walked her through a couple of mags so she could get comfortable with the hand gun. We went over loading the mags, inserting mags, racking the slide, grip, stance and trigger press. I had her watch me shoot my final mag while talking with her as I fired. I spent about a half hour giving basic instructions and then and watched as she went through a couple of mags until I felt she was comfortable and and more importantly safe. I suggested she get some training and went on my marry way. I hope that I did not overstep any boundaries. She seemed grateful for the advice. For some reason, I still feel like I should have minded my own business, but I did not want her first shot with her new handgun to be remembered by causing injury with a slide bite.

Do you think I did the right thing?
 

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Absolutely! I have no doubt that had she not wanted the help she would have let you know one way or another. You saved her from slide bite that quite probably would have ended her desire to have the handgun. I say GOOD JOB!
 

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Yes. You did. My fiancé has the same handgun and had the same exact issues. It took me forever to drill it into her head to just pull the slide back and let go. Don't ride it forward. I took my eyes off her after she seemed to be doing well. She misplaced her left hand and next thing I know I hear BANG and a millisecond later a scream. Crap. Slide bite on the top of her left thump. I got her gun ready to fire again and made her empty another magazine before I agreed to leave the range. She was shaking something terrible but I knew if she did not shoot again that day it would be months before she would shoot again.

My fiancé also has a heck of a time getting round #7 into her magazines. I've tried and tried again to teach her how but she only gets it once in a great while so I usually end up topping off her magazines for her. I've left all her mags loaded for a couple months to loosen the springs but that didn't seem to help her.
 

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I think you did the right thing. I think A lot of people would like to learn to shoot but don't know who to trust or who to ask. Not everyone can aford classes. I have helped girls and guys on the Range. It's better than them learning wrong, getting hurt, or getting in trouble.
 

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You did the right thing. Fear not, women have a distinct way of letting you know whether or not they're interested - in handguns and other things. But, like some men, they are often too proud to ask a question or ask for help.

I don't know where this misperception comes about gun people that they're all ******** or know-it-alls or creepy or whatever. To my mind, gun people are the most thoughtful helpful people I've ever known. Walk into any gun shop or gun show and ask any customer there for an opinion of something and they're right there to help you. Go to any gun range and the fellow next to you will usually be ready to help you or answer a question without judgment or arrogance. That's been my experience.
 

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I'd say you did the right thing, especially if she was receptive and grateful. Should probably be commended for your patience as well. I avoid a lot of indoor ranges for that exact reason, I don't feel comfortable in a lane next to someone that doesn't know how to operate their firearm or know anything about firearm safety and etiquette.
 

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I don't see anything wrong with what you did.

Was it rude? That really depends on how you presented yourself and how you explained things to her. If you were speaking down to her, then yes, it would have been rude, but it doesn't sound like that is what you did.

It sounds like you did a good job of helping somebody who is new to shooting. I would say you did a good job!
 

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I have help many a friend and neighbor over the years and a few at ranges so yes you did good especially advising them to seek further training.
 

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Yesterday, I went to the local in door range since it was raining here in Houston. I usually go to the outdoor range, where you stand shoulder to should in the shooting lanes and I keep to myself and don't "give advice" when not asked. I just don't want to be one of "those guys" that are going up and down the range telling people how to shoot. However, yesterday I could not help myself. There was this nice lady shooting next to me when I was about 2 mags left of ammo. While taking a break, I was watching her and based on her handling of her handgun, I new she was a noob. It looked like she literally took the handgun out of the box for the first time while getting ready in the lane next to me. The handgun was a Ruger LC380 with the DA hammer. I always kind of watch new shooters for safety reason (mine not theirs), so I was watching her while taking a little break. She loaded the mag ok, but road the slide causing the firearm not to go into battery. She then went to fire the gun and I tapped her on the shoulder to explain the slide did not go all the way forward. After clearing the firearm and then a brief conversation about just releasing the slide to allow it to go home forcefully, she was ready to go. So, that is what she did and ready herself to send a round down range, but I noticed her grip. She had wrapped her support (left) hand around her right hand (like a revolver grip) which I noticed her thumb was in the perfect place for a slide bite. Before she pressed the trigger, I tapped her on the shoulder again to stop her from firing. I did not want her to get a gouge taken out of her thumb. This time, I asked more questions about her handgun experience and yes, she just bought the firearm the day before for "protection".

So at this point, I asked her if she would mine if I walked her through a couple of mags so she could get comfortable with the hand gun. We went over loading the mags, inserting mags, racking the slide, grip, stance and trigger press. I had her watch me shoot my final mag while talking with her as I fired. I spent about a half hour giving basic instructions and then and watched as she went through a couple of mags until I felt she was comfortable and and more importantly safe. I suggested she get some training and went on my marry way. I hope that I did not overstep any boundaries. She seemed grateful for the advice. For some reason, I still feel like I should have minded my own business, but I did not want her first shot with her new handgun to be remembered by causing injury with a slide bite.

Do you think I did the right thing?
My trainer (female) has done that in the past. Slide bite can turn a new shooter away . It happened to my wife and she responded much better to my trainer then me. You did the right thing..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Because I just tapped her on the shoulder and butted in. I know that she could have gotten hurt, but I was not invited to help. I basically just gave her my 2 cents without being asked. She was receptive and I did not feel like she resented any advice.
 

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"Rude" would have been to remain silent and let her hurt herself. You did well.
 

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So...(I'm dissapointed in you all by the way)...was she hot? Did you get her digits?

:danceban:

Just kidding! You did a fine job, you offered advice and she accepted. You took the time to show her and let her do it to make sure she was on the right track.
 
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Good for you! You did well. I am quite certain the lady was very appreciative of your help.
 

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Because I just tapped her on the shoulder and butted in. I know that she could have gotten hurt, but I was not invited to help. I basically just gave her my 2 cents without being asked. She was receptive and I did not feel like she resented any advice.
The way I was brought up and the way I was trained is- range safety is everybody's business!

  • You see anyone doing anything potentially dangerous you say something.
  • You try to be tactful & diplomatic if possible, but you see someone that doesn't look like they know what they are doing you step in.
  • You see someone doing something stupid you call them on it.

This is anything from what you did (great job! btw), to actually calling ceasefire on the line. I've even called out other RSO's and an instructor or two for being careless.


-
 

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I say "good job". I bet for every person that would have thought this a rude intrusion, there are a few dozen newbies that wish someone like you had "butted in".
 
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OP, when I opened this thread I was prepared for a story about how you saw something you didn't like at the range, told the person about it in an attempt to help, and were told to go fly a kite. This was totally not that story. I can think of several times during my life where I wish someone had intervened while I was doing something ridiculous and foreign to me.

It sounds like you did your good deed for the week, is how I see it. I bet that lady sees it that way too. I bet she told someone about her positive experience and how a nice guy showed her how to shoot and operate the gun safely. She bought that firearm for self defense, and thanks to you, she's way more confident in her use of it. If she should ever end up having to use it for self defense, the time you took could mean a big difference in her outcome.
 
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