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1941 Winchester Model 74.

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I've been intrigued by the Winchester Model 74. Introduced on the eve of World War II, it has a sort of timeless "Buck Rogers" look about it. The magazine in the butt is neato and keeps the rifle looking trim. It's said that the interrelationship of the trigger and safety can be a weakness, but I'd have to experience the rifle to know if it could be true. Apparently was a problem for those who didn't read directions in the rifle's owner's manual more than anything else. I know I'd sneak up on one if it was a "deal."




My first gun was a Winchester Model 72 my dad bought at a hardware store in Charlotte, NC. A bolt action with target peep sights that were very accurate. I later had the receiver tapped and installed a 4X scope, but honestly, I still enjoy the peep sights more. I still have it and will not get rid of it. It has always had a feeding problem but never felt it was worth having a gunsmith fix it. I just break it down and clear it and keep on shooting. It has dropped literally hundreds of ground squirrels in my time in WA, often using .22 Shorts at 100+ yards to make it interesting. One learns Kentucky windage well in those windy conditions.

I've had my Dad's Winchester Model 72 in my possession for many, many years, but technically it's not actually mine. My first personal firearms were shotguns and I didn't buy my own rimfire until much later in my shooting experience. Now I have pistols, revolvers, and bolt-action, semi-auto as well as lever-action rimfire rifles. I don't know what took me so long to decide I needed more? :smile:
The Winchester Model 72 is a really, really fine rifle! Designed and introduced in the years just before World War II, it's very well made, with a fast lock time (some claim one of the very fastest), it's an accurate rifle and could be a contender to some of the better modern bolt-action .22s on the current market. Another one of those great pre-64 Winchester models now long gone.

Winchester Model 72


Remington 550
Another good rifle right there, the Remington Model 550. It was contemporary with the pre-World War II designed Winchester Model 74. David "Carbine" Williams of M1 Carbine fame was in on its design. Was made for a lot of years.

Remington Model 550
 

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My first?
A Mossberg 151Ma, tubular-magazine-in-buttstock, .22 semi-auto rifle.
I was given it new, for Christmas, in 1949.
I am unfamiliar with this model, but had to come back and add a photograph of it.
 

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Sears-Glenfield Model 43, Bolt action, tube fed, which Dad bought for me when I was in Boy Scouts. Much more practical than the peep sight single shot target rifle I wanted at the time.
Adding another photograph, assuming this is a depiction of the same rifle. Would have been a Marlin product. I've always had a soft spot for tube fed .22 repeating rifles. They seem more tidy than a magazine fed .22 rilfe. No magazine to project downward and generally hold more ammunition.
 

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The Winchester 1890 below technically wasn't "mine" until my parents passed, but it was my grandfather's and my dad used to shoot it at the local YMCA in Ridgewood, NJ when he was a kid. Mom was terrified of guns so it rarely saw the light of day when I was growing up, and I had to beg dad to take it out and use it. It's been seen on this forum before, but with our new .22 sub-forum I thought I'd show it again. Vintage 1909. and still in exceptionally good condition - lucky me!
 

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Those Mossbergs have a wonderful feel to them. It’s just hard to find one with all of the front sight parts attached.

I LOVE the Remington 550! If you can see it, you can hit it with the 550. I also like having a .22 Semi that cycles .22 Short as well as, .22 LR. Mix and match the rounds any way you please...the 550 will cycle and fire it. I read somewhere that it is based on a floating chamber?? design that was similar to the M1 Garand. All I know is that it shoots. Clean or dirty, it shoots.
They’re sorta my weakness. I’ve got 4 of them.
 

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Just adding more photographs found on the internet of the neato rifles folks are posting. It's fun to see examples of them all.


Savage Springfield Model 120 single shot .22. I passed it on to my nephew who trained his son and daughter with it and in a couple of years he will train his grand daughter. So it is still in the family. I used to regularly hit empty 20 ga shells with it off-hand snap shooting in the orange groves.
Savage Springfield Model 120



Grampa gave me a Remington model 34 bolt action 22. My son has it now.
Remington Model 34 NRA Target variant. The standard version would have sporting open sights.


My first was a Nylon 66. My fist pistol was a Single Six that I saved all summer for. My Dad got it for me when I was 15, $75 NIB. I put 500 rounds a week thru that old Ruger.
T

The first I bought?

A Remington Nylon 77. I was 13-14, and paid the princely sum of $45 for it...I wrote the check, even (dad filled out the paperwork, though). Unfortunately, I decided at one point to tear it apart and clean it...and it never worked right after that (I likely over lubed it). So, I traded it for a Marlin 25 bolt action (which I still have)...but I always missed that 77. Replaced it with a 66 before their prices got stupid, but it wasn’t the same...so I got really nice 10C a few years ago, for about 7x what I paid for the 77...:embarassed:

Oh man! I went through a phase around 1970 where I wanted a Remington Nylon 66 in Apache Black bad! Neighbor kid across the pasture had one. Nylon 66s and Nylon 77s are proof that there is nothing new under the sun with regards to plastic components. They were introduced before 1960.

Remington Nylon 66s (tube-fed semi-automatic) and Remington Nylon 77s (magazine-fed semi-automatic)



The first that I shot?

A Stevens Model 15A single shot bolt action; the kind that you had to pull back and cock the striker to fire. I was probably around 7 years old, and still remember the ammo (Remington .22 shorts) and the target (an old hubcap). I still have that rifle...dad gave it to me when they moved off the farm a few years ago; it was the “shop rifle”, and is very much worse for wear...one of these days, I’m going to have at it with steel wool and cold blue. It was, imho, the perfect rifle to learn on.
Stevens Model 15A



My first 22 was a Ithica 49. My Mom saved Green stamps to get it! Imagine that today! Buying a gun with stamps earned at the Grocery store!

A couple years back I bought another that will be our grand daughters! Its a single shot that is ramp fed so little fingers can easily load them themselves. DR

Ithica M49 saddle gun for my 6th birthday from my grandfather. Still have it, and still shoot it. My most prized firearm.
My best junior high bud had an Ithaca Model 49. We had a great time and even got into mischief with that little rifle, out on his grandfather's farm, on my family's home place, and out at our family place on the lake.

Ithaca Model 49


The lever opened the action.



My first, a semi-auto UNIQUE X51Bis.I got it new in 1983 and it's always in my possession;one of the most accurate semi auto ever build.
Regards
That's an attractive .22 rifle.

Unique X51Bis



First rimfire? Mossberg model 40, bolt-action tubular magazine. I believe Dad either bought it new or his dad bought it new for him. It's gonna go to my granddaughter.
First rimfire handgun was/is a Colt Diamondback.
First center fire rifle was a JPSauer & Sohn 8x57 Mauser.
There's another tubular magazine repeating .22 rifle.

Mossberg Model 40


My first memories shooting are with an old Marlin model 60. It belonged to my dad but I put most of the rounds through it. The first rimfire that was mine oddly enough was a ruger MKII pistol my dad bought for me when I was 14 or 15. I had quite a bit of experience shooting rifles and shot guns but my dad was never much of a handgun guy. I wanted to shoot a pistol, and badgered him until one Christmas he gave in and bought me a pistol. Still got it, just need to replace a broken extractor.
Good ol' ubiquitous Marlin Model 60. My huntin' cousin bought one new on an occasion when I was with him back in 1976. He still has it and it's still working.

Marlin Model 60
 

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Thanks Bryan, mine was originally the standard version with open sights, but my uncle put a Lyman peep on the rear. It is still very difficult to miss with this rifle.
I felt it was “Unsporting” and begged my dad for a revolver. He responded with a 9” Single Six...still couldn’t miss.
 

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...Mix and match the rounds any way you please...the 550 will cycle and fire it. I read somewhere that it is based on a floating chamber?? design that was similar to the M1 Garand...[emphasis added]
Ain't no "floating chamber" in a M1 Garand. Nor in a M1 Carbine, either.

There's a floating chamber in the Colt's Ace, and the Colt's .22 conversion for the 1911, and in the Remington .380 pistol, though.
 

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Thanks Bryan! I don't think I had ever seen a pic of that old Savage Springfield. My Uncle who was a Deputy Sheriff got it for me off one of his fellow deputies.:danceban:
 
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My first shooting experience with a .22 was between the second and third grades at a YMCA summer camp (Same time I got a Mohawk haircut. Got over that fad early, unlike some "adults" nowadays.) I was eight at the time.

Don't remember what make of rifle, but it was .22 shorts and had that big knob on the back of the bolt that had to be pulled back to cock it. I hated that knob then and still do. Why anyone thought that made the gun safer is beyond me.
 
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Ain't no "floating chamber" in a M1 Garand. Nor in a M1 Carbine, either.

There's a floating chamber in the Colt's Ace, and the Colt's .22 conversion for the 1911, and in the Remington .380 pistol, though.
Thanks! Maybe that is why I could never find any clear info on that. :confused:
 

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A Hamilton break action single shot.

$12.50 mail ordered out of the back of either the American Rifleman or Outdoor Life by my father.
My dad had a Hamilton. his parents had a dairy, and 1 in every 1000 bags of feed had a certificate for a Hamilton rifle. With a certificate and two dollars [shipping and handling] every farm kid had one. It had a flat board stock that sort of resembled a gun stock, and a sheet metal peep sight. But it was a Real 22. DR
 

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Oh, the Hamilton. Likely a Model 27. Way primitive as a design.

There was one around the place when I was a kid. Don't know where it came from. Perhaps it had belonged to my dad and his brothers when they were kids down on the farm. Perhaps my dad scared it up somewhere. It stayed out in the shop building. Looked rough. The stock was loose (they were all loose). I shot it on occasion, even though I was scared of it and I was really young and didn't recognize a guns relative soundness. Shot high-velocity Long Rifles through it even and with no problems. Would just about hit a gallon gas can at 15 yards. The bore was trashed.

Later the neighbor's boy took a shining to it. He was about seven. We'd catch him in our shop building, having walked half a mile or more across the pasture by himself, fiddling with it. We'd fuss at him, tell his parents. He was ill-disciplined though and returned. One day it went missing. Didn't think much about it. Several years later it was found when digging up one of my mother's front flower beds and was then thrown away.

Ran onto one a while back and thought about bringing it home, just for fun. It was a little over $100 though and didn't look like that much fun.



Action details




More than you'd ever want to learn about Hamilton and its most common model. Can you say "cheap?" We thought you could.

THE QUINTESSENTIAL BOY’S RIFLE: HAMILTON’S MODEL 27
 

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My first came from SEARS, but I have no clue who manufactured it.

Had a 7 round Magazine. Bolt action.

I remember my dad taking it with us to Lake Superior one summer. We stood on rocks at the shoreline and he threw the only target we had (an empty coke can) in the water. Handed me the rifle and said I got first shot. I sunk it. We were both surprised and he remarked, "Heck you didn't even give me a chance."

Great memories with that .22.
 

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I wanted an Ithaca 49 so badly. I dreamt about owning one and I saved and saved and saved for one. Not sure what happened and I can't remember how it came into my possession, but I got a breech loading single shot .22 made in 1909. Loading it was exactly the same as the Ithaca 49. Drop the trigger guard as you would a lever, load the breech, close the breech, hammer back, aim, and fire. I believe it may have been a Savage. Wish I still had that gun! Wow! Does this ever bring back memories.
 

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Not the first one I shot but the first one that was truly mine was (is) my Browning Buckmark Camper bought back in the late '90's. I still have it and still shoot it, only thing I've done is changed to stock barrel out for a Tactical Solutions threaded barrel. It still shoots great and it's accurate too, I've taken small critters with it. Suppressed it's even more fun.
 
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